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演題詳細

Poster

体性感覚
Somatosensory System

開催日 2014/9/13
時間 14:00 - 15:00
会場 Poster / Exhibition(Event Hall B)

キイロショウジョウバエ脳における体性感覚中枢の機能的解析
Functional analysis of the somatosensory center of the Drosophila melanogaster brain

  • P3-150
  • 矢野 朋子 / Tomoko Yano:1 横山 健 / Takeshi Yokoyama: 坪内 朝子 / Asako Tsubouchi: 伊藤 啓 / Kei Ito: 
  • 1:東京大学分子細胞生物学研究所 / IMCB, University of Tokyo  

Insects and mammals share similar systems to detect diverse types of sensory signals. Somatosensation, such as detecting mechanical or heat stimuli, is one of them. Because similar molecular mechanisms between insects and mammals have already been revealed in their peripheral somatosensory cells, there should be common principles in the design and kinesics of the sensory centers in the brain, in spite of the large difference in cell numbers. Insect's visual, olfactory, gustatory, and auditory centers have been studied extensively to reveal similarities with mammalian counterparts. However, not so much is known about the somatosensory center in their brains. In this study, we are performing calcium imaging for functional and morphological analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster brain by using GAL4/UAS expression driver system to identify its first-order somatosensory center. We have established a new experiment system for analyzing somatic sensation in the fly nervous system. We use a two-photon microscope for calcium imaging, a piezo-electric device for mechanical stimulation, a gentle wind generator for wind stimulation, and infrared laser for heat stimulation. These devices are controlled by a pulse stimulator, enabling the application of stimuli in a reproducible manner for each experimental animal. We observed several neuronal activities that were induced by each type of stimuli, and determined the peripheral origins of the responded neurons. Our results show a glimpse of functional and spatial map in the putative somatosensory center of the fly brain.

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